Blog

Fall Hours

Serenity Lavender is happy to announce its fall hours.  We will be open throughout the Fall on Saturdays & Sundays from 11AM-5PM.

Spend a beautiful, Fall weekend with us at Serenity Lavender!

Coming soon: Lavender Christmas ornaments

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Pruning Lavender

Keeping lavender plants in shape is one of the best ways of maintaining a healthy and vigorous bush.  Pruning at Serenity Lavender begins when the plant is still in the greenhouse and continues once or twice a year for the whole life of the plant.  The best time to prune is in the fall after bloom.  Both the top and sides of the plant need to be pruned to generate new growth and prevent legginess or splitting of the branches.  Some varieties have a sprawling habitat and a nice thick bush for a lavender plant is the optimal goal.  As a general rule, the lavender plant may be pruned back by one third.  Be sure to trim only the soft green branches and not get into the wood of the plant.

In the springtime pruning may be required to regenerate growth after a harsh winter.  Cut back any dead wood until you see green in the stems.  If there has been a lot of winter damage it may be wise to prune in stages over a number of years to slowly bring the plant back to its vibrant self.  Although the plants sold at Serenity Lavender are suitable Zones 4-5  (we are zone 6a), winter survival is influenced by location, plant size, mulch type, plant cover and of course temperature.

Otherwise, pruning your Serenity Lavender plant in the spring should be minimal (only on the sides), if any at all, to allow for a full flowering show in July.

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Lavender Research Project

Serenity Lavender is pleased to be a part of a 4 year reasearch project to identify lavender varieties suitable for Ontario growing conditions.  The project involves seven farm sites, the Ontario Ministry of  Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs and the University of Guelph. Twenty two lavender varieties are being reviewed.  While the project got off to a bit of a slow start with some plants dying while being shipped,  an  interim report has now been released.  The initial results suggest that fabric mulch and sandy soils, such as those found at Serenity Lavender resulted in a larger plant size and better quality plant shape.  The French lavadin varieties also had abetter shape and size compared to the English or angustifolia varieties.  Winter survival will be assessed in the spring this year and the results across Ontario will be interesting given the large amount of snowfall and cold conditions experienced.

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